Infinity

O'Steen Brothers employees Eddie Wesley and John Ludwig work outside Infinity Hall on July 29, 2015.

Nicole Gomez / Alligator Staff

Along with about 308 students, Infinity Hall will house more than 10 local companies this Fall.

The A2 Fab Lab, the Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, [email protected], Mint Studio and seven companies associated with Starter Space began the moving process to Infinity Hall on Monday. 

The ground floor of the building will be the new home for these companies as well as the living amenities for the hall’s residents.

“This model brings academic and community resources into the residential environment, which will create an unparalleled environment for aspiring entrepreneurs,” T.J. Logan, director of housing for administrative services at the Department of Housing and Residence Education, wrote in an email.

According to Logan, the residence hall located in Innovation Square will offer career and networking opportunities to students through the companies on the ground floor. Student move-in will start on Aug. 18.

He said this is the first time a residence hall’s purpose is to support entrepreneurship and innovation on campus.

Quang Tran, co-founder of Starter Space, an entrepreneurial co-working community that provides space and resources for a variety of ventures, said the new location is advantageous because of increased exposure to students and the Innovation Square community. Starter Space was previously located at 308 W. University Ave.

The company is a network of several startups and ventures, but Tran said it is also a startup itself.

The seven companies moving to Infinity with Starter Space are CollegeVox, Gainesville Media, HaulBox, Sari Market, We Are Neutral, Hyperlynx Media and an unnamed app developer. Others may join them at the new location in the future.

Tran said the hall is going to be a place to live, work and play.

Mathew Chandler, director of the A2 Fab Lab, said the move from its location in room 307 in the architecture building has allowed it to expand its exposure and size.

The lab is best known for its 3-D printing but provides other services including laser cutting.

The location in the architecture building limited them by forcing people to only come to the lab when they sought it out. Its third-floor location was something he said people do not happen to walk by.

Chandler believes having more than 300 residents walking by on a daily basis will increase interest and make the lab less intimidating to students.

The lab will be open in the hall starting Aug. 24. It will have a team of about 15 people, including about 10 interns. At least two of the interns will be living in Infinity, he said.

“Once we’re right there below where they live, they’re going to be more familiar and not be scared to come,” Chandler said.

[A version of this story ran on page 16 on 8/5/15]