Less than half of all sexually active UF students used a condom the last time they had sex.

According to the latest GatorWell Sexual Health Student Survey Report, only 47.2 percent used one for vaginal intercourse. The percentage drops for oral and anal.

What’s up with that, guys?

Why is there no — excuse my pun — love for the glove?

Condoms are the Swiss Army knives of contraceptives.

They do everything.

Not only do they prevent pregnancy if used correctly, but they also protect against sexually transmitted infections.

But there’s more to condoms than what you learned in sex ed. Yes, condoms allow you to have safe sex, but they also help you have satisfying sex.

Condoms allow me personally to relax and focus on my and my partner’s pleasure.

I’m not worried about the potential for pregnancy or disease.

It might be that I am too paranoid, but I wouldn’t be able to enjoy sex as much.

I wouldn’t be thinking, “Yes! More! This is the best I’ve ever had!” if there wasn’t that safety net.

I think the inner dialogue would sound more like: “Don’t come yet! No, not in me! Not yet, please not on the sheets — I just washed those. Don’t come in me, don’t come in me, don’t come in me.”

Condoms are easy to use and incredibly effective when used correctly. And — in my opinion — more fun.

They usually have some sort of lubrication, and the slick from that is generally good enough that there’s no need for an awkward, mood-killing Astroglide-grab from the nightstand.

That lubrication goes a long way in making sex more comfortable for both partners, and good sex is all about comfort.

If you need more than lube, or if plain-Jane condoms don’t do it for you, there are many different types created just to help get you off.

Sometimes — sorry, gentlemen — those ribs for her pleasure are really the make-or-break difference between an orgasm and a disappointing night.

Don’t think you’re left out, guys — condoms have some hidden powers for you, too. If you have a problem with, ahem, finishing too soon, condoms might reduce sensations and help you last longer. Trojan even sells special “climax control” condoms designed to prevent premature ejaculation.

Outside of penetrative sex, condoms work great for oral sex, too.

Flavored condoms can mask the taste of your man-friend, who hasn’t showered in a few days, making it a lot more pleasant to show your affection.

Non-lubricated condoms can also be cut open for use as a dental dam, which acts as a barrier between the mouth and vagina or anus.

There is no excuse for us, as college students, to not use condoms. They are practically shoved in our face in an effort to make sure we have safer sex. As long as you pay to go here, you might as well take advantage of the free condoms on campus.

Condoms can be found for free at the Student Infirmary, at the Planned Parenthood on 13th Street and from various tabling groups like GatorWell and Voices for Planned Parenthood.

Even if you have to pay for condoms yourself, the few bucks you pay for a box is much cheaper than what you would pay for Plan B or — God forbid — a baby.

So, don’t ruin your sheets, don’t get pregnant and definitely get that weird rash checked out. And please, for the sake of you and your partner, wear a rubber.

[A version of this story ran on page 10 on 1/23/2014 under the headline "Wrap it before you tap it"]