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Saturday, September 25, 2021

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More than 250 people attended the weekly farmers market held at Bo Diddley Community Plaza off of East University Avenue on Wednesday from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. The market — held every week of the year — supports local producers and provides the city of Gainesville with entertainment from live performances.
SLIDESHOW

FRESH, FUN & FRIENDLY

More than 250 people attended the weekly farmers market held at Bo Diddley Community Plaza off of East University Avenue on Wednesday from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. The market — held every week of the year — supports local producers and provides the city of Gainesville with entertainment from live performances.


This week, IA Serve is hosting “Welcome to the Gator Nation” to help UF transfer students and those from Innovation Academy and Pathway to Campus Enrollment get involved on campus. Tuesday evening’s gathering included hot cocoa and board games in the Beaty Towers recreation room to “escape the cold.”
 
SLIDESHOW

SPRINGIN’ IN

This week, IA Serve is hosting “Welcome to the Gator Nation” to help UF transfer students and those from Innovation Academy and Pathway to Campus Enrollment get involved on campus. Tuesday evening’s gathering included hot cocoa and board games in the Beaty Towers recreation room to “escape the cold.”  


UF’s a cappella community is known for hosting an annual Falala Capella concert, and this year’s concert was held by Tone Def on Tuesday night inside the Reitz Union Auditorium. The opening group, The Staff, UF’s all male a cappella group, started with the parody song “Enormous Penis (Sleigh Bells).” Other performances included coed a cappella groups Standing Room Only, No Southern Accent, Gestalt and all-female group The Sedoctaves. The show closed with Tone Def performing “We Wish You A Merry Christmas” to get into the holiday spirit.
SLIDESHOW

SOUNDS OF THE SEASON

UF’s a cappella community is known for hosting an annual Falala Capella concert, and this year’s concert was held by Tone Def on Tuesday night inside the Reitz Union Auditorium. The opening group, The Staff, UF’s all male a cappella group, started with the parody song “Enormous Penis (Sleigh Bells).” Other performances included coed a cappella groups Standing Room Only, No Southern Accent, Gestalt and all-female group The Sedoctaves. The show closed with Tone Def performing “We Wish You A Merry Christmas” to get into the holiday spirit.


By Melissa Gomez
When Bill Clinton visited Gainesville on Saturday, Ed Kellerman got the former president to sign his favorite shirt.
When the 64-year-old UF master lecturer met Bill Clinton, he handed him a frame full of political buttons, one of which he created.
“I feel privileged he has one of my buttons now,” Kellerman said.
The second floor of the Gainesville resident’s house is decorated in memorabilia, mostly from presidential elections, ranging from buttons and bobbleheads to banners and trinkets. The trinkets, some of which are about a decade old, span the political spectrum, but he considers himself a Democrat.
Kellerman said he remembers when Bill Clinton visited UF in 1992, a scene he captured with a camera and put onto one of the buttons he gave to Bill Clinton on Saturday.
Cardboard cutouts of former presidents sit in his house, along with two lifesize cutouts of Hillary Clinton. He has a blue cone that reads “Holler for Change” and a beer can that reads “Billary Beer.”
On Wednesday, the day after the election, he said he plans on bringing both of the cutouts of Hillary Clinton to one of his classes to show support for her presidency.
Kellerman said Hillary Clinton’s background as secretary of state proves she has the diplomacy skills to succeed as the next president.
“If she’s not ready, then who is?” he said.
SLIDESHOW

‘If she’s not ready, then who is?’

By Melissa Gomez When Bill Clinton visited Gainesville on Saturday, Ed Kellerman got the former president to sign his favorite shirt. When the 64-year-old UF master lecturer met Bill Clinton, he handed him a frame full of political buttons, one of which he created. “I feel privileged he has one of my buttons now,” Kellerman said. The second floor of the Gainesville resident’s house is decorated in memorabilia, mostly from presidential elections, ranging from buttons and bobbleheads to banners and trinkets. The trinkets, some of which are about a decade old, span the political spectrum, but he considers himself a Democrat. Kellerman said he remembers when Bill Clinton visited UF in 1992, a scene he captured with a camera and put onto one of the buttons he gave to Bill Clinton on Saturday. Cardboard cutouts of former presidents sit in his house, along with two lifesize cutouts of Hillary Clinton. He has a blue cone that reads “Holler for Change” and a beer can that reads “Billary Beer.” On Wednesday, the day after the election, he said he plans on bringing both of the cutouts of Hillary Clinton to one of his classes to show support for her presidency. Kellerman said Hillary Clinton’s background as secretary of state proves she has the diplomacy skills to succeed as the next president. “If she’s not ready, then who is?” he said.


By Max Chesnes
During presidential elections, John Davis, 67, usually supports the Democratic candidate.
But after years of frustration with the Clinton family, Davis is jumping from blue to red.
Exhausted from years of scandal, Davis said he decided to vote for Donald Trump after Hillary Clinton was named the Democratic nominee. His decision was made with the nation’s future at the forefront of his mind, he said.
For the past 16 years, Davis has lived in Gainesville with his jet-black cat, Mr. Sampson. Five Trump-Pence signs stand in his yard, with another reading “Never Stop Me From Rattling Cages with the Truth” — one of two signs he made himself out of cardboard.
With tears in his eyes, Davis said he’s upset with the nation for allowing Clinton to gain traction despite her scandals. Because Davis is blind in one eye, a friend writes Davis’ thoughts about his dissatisfaction with politics on scraps of notebook paper every day.
“There are nicer guys,” he said of Trump, with Ben Carson and Paul Ryan having been his first choices. “I myself want to be proud to be an American again.”
In the days leading up to the election, Davis said he has found it hard to sleep. He said the fears of a corrupt commander in chief riddle his mind.
“I’m worried about what will happen on Election Day,” he said, “but we’ll just have to wait and see.”
SLIDESHOW

‘I myself want to be proud to be an American again’

By Max Chesnes During presidential elections, John Davis, 67, usually supports the Democratic candidate. But after years of frustration with the Clinton family, Davis is jumping from blue to red. Exhausted from years of scandal, Davis said he decided to vote for Donald Trump after Hillary Clinton was named the Democratic nominee. His decision was made with the nation’s future at the forefront of his mind, he said. For the past 16 years, Davis has lived in Gainesville with his jet-black cat, Mr. Sampson. Five Trump-Pence signs stand in his yard, with another reading “Never Stop Me From Rattling Cages with the Truth” — one of two signs he made himself out of cardboard. With tears in his eyes, Davis said he’s upset with the nation for allowing Clinton to gain traction despite her scandals. Because Davis is blind in one eye, a friend writes Davis’ thoughts about his dissatisfaction with politics on scraps of notebook paper every day. “There are nicer guys,” he said of Trump, with Ben Carson and Paul Ryan having been his first choices. “I myself want to be proud to be an American again.” In the days leading up to the election, Davis said he has found it hard to sleep. He said the fears of a corrupt commander in chief riddle his mind. “I’m worried about what will happen on Election Day,” he said, “but we’ll just have to wait and see.”



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