Sounds of India
A live band sings along with mridangas, the drums of India, Monday afternoon. The performance is part of the Festival of India, a presentation of the culture and history of Vedic India, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The Hare Krishnas set up more than their normal lunch buffet Monday.

The third annual Festival of India, which took place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., featured four different tents with educational displays where students could ask questions about Krishna beliefs or learn about vegetarianism, reincarnation and the Illustrated Bhagavad Gita sacred text.

About 100 students stopped by the tents throughout the day.

The event was sponsored by the Krishna House, an outreach center where students can live or learn about the beliefs of the Hare Krishnas.

Billy Frasier, a mechanical engineering junior, was on his way to Library West when he stopped to look at the Illustrated Bhagavad Gita tent.

“It’s all very strange to me,” he said. “The idea of reincarnation and karma and Hare Krishna. I couldn’t even think about going vegetarian.”

The event did not just feature educational displays.

Krishna-kripa Dasa, an expert on the Hare Krishna’s sacred text sang about the Bhagavad Gita throughout the morning. 

Krishna-kripa Dasa and Carl Woodham, chaplain of Krishna House, also walked around the lawn answering questions from students, including questions about the sacred text.

Erika Trnka, a linguistics junior, said she liked the exhibit because it was informational and the Hare Krishnas were not pushy.

“It allows me to learn about Krishna without feeling like I’m being preached to,” Trnka said.