Soon-to-be Speaker of The House John Boehner will soon add another title to his name: Fashion Police.

Florida’s Rep.-elect Frederica Wilson, known for her grandiose and bedazzled hats, has made it known she intends to keep her fancy-schmancy hat-wearing tradition alive in Washington. But to do that, Wilson must first challenge a 173-year-old ban on wearing hats on the House floor.

Not only will the fate of Social Security, tax cuts and energy bills lie in the hands of Speaker Boehner, but the top dog in the House of Representatives will now be the star of Washington’s own “What Not To Wear.”

Calling the ban on hats inside the Congressional chambers “sexist,” Wilson wants to chitchat with Congress about Congress’ fashionable future.

While we don’t find anything sexist about Wilson’s claims of a congressional hat embargo, we don’t see any huge deal with members of Congress voting on allowing its members to don a stylin’ flapper or sweet top hat.

In fact, we applaud Wilson’s quirky claims of her freedom to wear bejeweled cowgirl hats. Hats often define historical contexts, including the flapper of the ‘20s, the top hat, the bowler and don’t we even have a song about the tri-pointed Minute Men hat?

But for a matter this trivial to take up congressional time is silly when we should be focusing on, you know, cutting unemployment and the deficit and other not-as-important-as-an-anti-hat-rule issues.

As we hope Marie Antoinette would have said, “Let them wear hats.”