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Tuesday, April 13, 2021
<p>Sitting on a wooden bed of screws and rubber bands, UF anthropology junior Van Truong, 20, scans over an incomplete 6 foot by 8 foot Mona Lisa art piece at the Pop-Up Culture event on the Plaza of the Americas on Oct. 14, 2015. Truong, who helped put the event together, opened her project to all students at the event to gather “inspiration from other people who approach art and life differently.”</p>

Sitting on a wooden bed of screws and rubber bands, UF anthropology junior Van Truong, 20, scans over an incomplete 6 foot by 8 foot Mona Lisa art piece at the Pop-Up Culture event on the Plaza of the Americas on Oct. 14, 2015. Truong, who helped put the event together, opened her project to all students at the event to gather “inspiration from other people who approach art and life differently.”

On Erika Feazell’s way to class, color caught her eye.

The 18-year-old UF criminology and law freshman strolled on the Plaza of the Americas and looked at the UF College of the Arts’ Pop-Up Culture event, where paintings hung between trees on clothesline, hip-hop dancers performed and students waited for screen-printed T-shirts. About 500 people attended.

Booths with photo frames and props, painted temporary Chinese tattoos and a letterpress where students made small posters lined the sidewalks as the college celebrated National Art and Humanities Month, said Leah Spellman, the public relations and marketing manager of the UF College of the Arts.

Feazell said she liked the Sci Chic booth, where students showed off their 3-D printed jewelry.

Erin Winick, the UF mechanical engineering senior who created Sci Chic, launched the science-inspired fashion and jewelry line last week.

"It was a way for me to combine my passion of 3-D printing, fashion and engineering," the 21-year-old said.

Feazell said her favorite piece of jewelry was the large, blue atom-shaped necklace Winick was wearing.

After moseying around the event and talking with people at several booths, she said she picked up a free T-shirt that was screen-printed on the Plaza of the Americas.

Spellman said students don’t always know about the college’s resources, such as lectures or activities.

"A wonderful part of the college experience is to engage in activities," she said.

The event had a larger turnout than last year, with 34 registered groups compared to the 14 last year.

"The more people know about it, the bigger it gets," she said.

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Sitting on a wooden bed of screws and rubber bands, UF anthropology junior Van Truong, 20, scans over an incomplete 6 foot by 8 foot Mona Lisa art piece at the Pop-Up Culture event on the Plaza of the Americas on Oct. 14, 2015. Truong, who helped put the event together, opened her project to all students at the event to gather “inspiration from other people who approach art and life differently.”

Uniq Screen Printing manager Joevanny Reices, 22, manually screen prints a T-shirt during the Pop-Up Culture event on the Plaza of Americas. Students were offered a free live-screen printed T-shirts after completing a Pop-Up culture passport that consisted of five stamps found at different tables at the event.

Brandon DelPino, a 19-year-old UF music and chemistry sophomore, plays the trombone with his band Solar Ellipsis during the Pop-Up Culture event on Oct. 14, 2015. DelPino has been playing with the three-man jazz hip-hop fusion band for about one year.

Associate in Book Arts Ellen Knudson (left) teaches Adela Kore, a 21-year-old UF nutrition senior, how to use her 1960s-era letterpress. At the Pop-Up Culture event, Knudson said the press was doing what it was made for: quick, dirty, handmade posters.

Melissa Vailikit, a 19-year-old UF international studies and Chinese sophomore, paints the Chinese character for love on Catey Clark, an 18-year-old dance freshman, at UF’s Pop-Up Culture event, which celebrated arts and humanities. “Everyone needs love,” Clark said about her symbol choice.

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