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Sunday, March 03, 2024

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VIDEO

Vision Party wins Spring 2024 executive ticket, majority Senate seats

As Supervisor of Elections Ethan Halle stood on the stairs above the Reitz atrium, the ground floor came to a hush as students set down their Sprite cups and lowered their cardboard cutouts of candidates’ heads. The results were in. Vision Party swept the executive ticket of the Spring 2024 SG election, electing John Brinkman as student body president. Laura Thomas and Saketh Damera, both from Vision, will serve as vice president and treasurer. Filmed by Gabriella Aulisio, Kyle King and Ben Nielsen


VIDEO

UF Student Government Executive Debate 2024

UF students gathered at the Reitz Grand Ballroom Feb. 12 to watch Change Party's and Vision Party's Spring 2024 executive ticket candidates debate in preparation for the upcoming Student Government election. Filmed by Ben Nielsen, Kyle King and Gabriella Aulisio Edited by Kyle King Thumbnail photo by Evelyn Miguel


VIDEO

Gainesville hosts 37th Hoggetowne Medieval Faire

Flocks of families, friends and fabled characters gathered at Depot Park Jan. 27-28 to revel in warm weather and high spirits at the 37th annual Hoggetowne Medieval Faire. This year’s event offered a different spin on the typical three-weekend affair, with free admission, a one-weekend schedule and a smaller event space.


VIDEO

Alachua County gathers for celebratory parades of Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Hundreds of Alachua County residents took to the streets Monday, commemorating the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. through a series of county-wide celebrations. Jan. 15 marked the 40th anniversary of Gainesville's celebration honoring King, and Micanopy’s first annual march. The events were filled with signs, speeches, awards and hotdogs.


VIDEO

Where's the line; Freedom of Speech

Editors Note: This video contains profanity and mention of sex. Ashleigh Lucas is a first-year journalism major doing videography for The Alligator. She specializes in Multimedia Journalism where she one day hopes to work as a reporter in Broadcast news. She's had work published for the NewsPress, and maintained a two year internship with the School District of Lee County producing news packages. In her free time, she likes to watch films and practice her photography skills.


VIDEO

50 Years On: Editorial Independence in Student Journalism Webinar

The Alligator has a long history of fighting for First Amendment rights and protecting free speech and the public’s right to know. Fifty years ago, then-editor Ron Sachs was at the forefront of the controversy that forever changed the newspaper—and its name. Hear from Sachs and retired UF journalism professor Jean Chance on why one of the Alligator’s most prominent stories is about the paper itself and the student journalists who fought for, and won, editorial independence. Moderated by Master Lecturer Mike Foley. As you heard in yesterday’s webinar, the Alligator is printing one day per week and our online content is stronger than ever. We are adapting to the world around us to continue serving as an accurate, reliable news source for UF students, Gainesville residents and beyond. Can you help make that possible? Please consider making a secure donation through our website at: https://www.alligator.org/page/donate


VIDEO

50 Years On: Editorial independence in Student Journalism.

The Alligator has a long history of fighting for First Amendment rights and protecting free speech and the public’s right to know. Fifty years ago, then-editor Ron Sachs was at the forefront of the controversy that forever changed the newspaper—and its name. Hear from Sachs and retired UF journalism professor Jean Chance on why one of the Alligator’s most prominent stories is about the paper itself and the student journalists who fought for, and won, editorial independence. Please join us in Wednesday, December 1st at 6 p.m. by visiting http://alligator.org/webinar


Transcript
VIDEO

Critter Creek

Erin Amerman opened Critter Creek Farm Sanctuary in 2016, but had been thinking about it since 1997. The 210-acre farm is home to many animals once destined for the slaughterhouse, but Amerman isn't satsified. She won't stop until the sanctuary is no longer needed.


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