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Sunday, June 16, 2024

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Reina Saco and her family immigrated from Cuba to the United States when she was 4. They were held in a refugee camp for about a year before being paroled. Today, she is a Gainesville city commissioner-at-large -- a highly educated woman who strives to assist low-income and immigrant community members while maintaining the city's safety. Saco recently gave birth to her first child, Jojo. She works with her husband, Adam, to balance motherhood and government all at once. Holding a powerful position as a woman, immigrant and mother puts her in uncomfortable and dangerous situations daily, yet she remains brave and bold in her actions, words and lifestyle. 
SLIDESHOW

A glance at reality for Gainesville City Commissioner-at-Large Reina Saco

Reina Saco and her family immigrated from Cuba to the United States when she was 4. They were held in a refugee camp for about a year before being paroled. Today, she is a Gainesville city commissioner-at-large -- a highly educated woman who strives to assist low-income and immigrant community members while maintaining the city's safety. Saco recently gave birth to her first child, Jojo. She works with her husband, Adam, to balance motherhood and government all at once. Holding a powerful position as a woman, immigrant and mother puts her in uncomfortable and dangerous situations daily, yet she remains brave and bold in her actions, words and lifestyle. 


The Florida Gators gymnastics gave fans a preview of their upcoming 2024 season with their Hype Night Monday, Dec. 4. The team competed in all four apparatuses, showing off their routines on the floor, balance beam, uneven bars and vault. Gators seniors Victoria Nguyen and Chloi Clark kicked off their fourth year in college, while new faces like freshman Kaylee Bluffstone donned the orange and blue for the first time. 
SLIDESHOW

Florida Gators gymnastics debuts 2024 team at Hype Night

The Florida Gators gymnastics gave fans a preview of their upcoming 2024 season with their Hype Night Monday, Dec. 4. The team competed in all four apparatuses, showing off their routines on the floor, balance beam, uneven bars and vault. Gators seniors Victoria Nguyen and Chloi Clark kicked off their fourth year in college, while new faces like freshman Kaylee Bluffstone donned the orange and blue for the first time. 


It came from outer space and settled on a small stage in Gainesville. The feature crept up in the form of a summer-themed production of The Rocky Horror Picture Show. The show, presented by Glory Days & Frankie and The Pretenders, will be held at the High Dive, located at 210 SW 2nd Ave, until Aug. 2. The stage, adorned with pool noodles and dildos, hosts the stilettos-wearing cast while the original 1975 picture plays behind them. The troupe puts on its Rocky “Super Wet Supersoaker Summer Extravaganza” throughout July and early August each year.
SLIDESHOW

PHOTOS: Summer-themed Rocky Horror Picture Show

It came from outer space and settled on a small stage in Gainesville. The feature crept up in the form of a summer-themed production of The Rocky Horror Picture Show. The show, presented by Glory Days & Frankie and The Pretenders, will be held at the High Dive, located at 210 SW 2nd Ave, until Aug. 2. The stage, adorned with pool noodles and dildos, hosts the stilettos-wearing cast while the original 1975 picture plays behind them. The troupe puts on its Rocky “Super Wet Supersoaker Summer Extravaganza” throughout July and early August each year.


After years of hard work and engineering obstacles, the Solar Gators revealed their newest solar-powered car at UF’s New Engineering Building Thursday. The car is set to compete at the Formula Sun Grand Prix at Topeka, Kansas, throughout the week. 
Designed and assembled completely by UF students, the “Sunrider” can reach speeds up to 50 mph, and a single battery pack can power it through 200 miles. 
The week-long competition consists of four days of scrutineering, where experts test and inspect every piece of the vehicle, followed by three days of racing. It’s a race of endurance where previous winners reached 700 miles through multiple battery packs. The team will compete against 14 other groups from across the United States and Canada. Irene Chung, president-elect of Solar Gators, said winning this competition will qualify them for larger competitions such as the American Solar Challenge. However, more hurdles await them at the racetrack, she said. 
“As you start driving,” she said, “you start seeing things that you’ve never seen before, and you’ve got to debug and problem solve on the fly.”
SLIDESHOW

PHOTOS: Solar Gators showcase their solar-powered vehicle for national competition

After years of hard work and engineering obstacles, the Solar Gators revealed their newest solar-powered car at UF’s New Engineering Building Thursday. The car is set to compete at the Formula Sun Grand Prix at Topeka, Kansas, throughout the week.  Designed and assembled completely by UF students, the “Sunrider” can reach speeds up to 50 mph, and a single battery pack can power it through 200 miles.  The week-long competition consists of four days of scrutineering, where experts test and inspect every piece of the vehicle, followed by three days of racing. It’s a race of endurance where previous winners reached 700 miles through multiple battery packs. The team will compete against 14 other groups from across the United States and Canada. Irene Chung, president-elect of Solar Gators, said winning this competition will qualify them for larger competitions such as the American Solar Challenge. However, more hurdles await them at the racetrack, she said.  “As you start driving,” she said, “you start seeing things that you’ve never seen before, and you’ve got to debug and problem solve on the fly.”


The Florida Heritage Foods Initiative launched its third farmers market May 8 to showcase Florida’s agricultural diversity from cultures across the globe. Co-hosted with Grove Street Farmers Market on 1001 NW 4th St., it brought additional small-scale vendors and educational groups to feature the history and impact of worldwide cultural influence to local farming. The FHFI is a three-year USDA grant project between the Florida Organic Growers and Santa Fe College. Event coordinator Kathy Anderson said each FHFI farmers market will present a new theme based on in-season agriculture and international holidays. “Each farmers market will be a unique experience,” she said. “It all stems on what’s in season for that event, and the time of year for the event.”
SLIDESHOW

PHOTOS: A taste of Florida’s rich food heritage

The Florida Heritage Foods Initiative launched its third farmers market May 8 to showcase Florida’s agricultural diversity from cultures across the globe. Co-hosted with Grove Street Farmers Market on 1001 NW 4th St., it brought additional small-scale vendors and educational groups to feature the history and impact of worldwide cultural influence to local farming. The FHFI is a three-year USDA grant project between the Florida Organic Growers and Santa Fe College. Event coordinator Kathy Anderson said each FHFI farmers market will present a new theme based on in-season agriculture and international holidays. “Each farmers market will be a unique experience,” she said. “It all stems on what’s in season for that event, and the time of year for the event.”


Elaine Hargrove’s life since retirement is filled with trips around the world with her husband Kevin, enjoying live music and dancing like no one’s watching. She also performs her own music for charity.
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PHOTOS: Elaine Hargrove

Elaine Hargrove’s life since retirement is filled with trips around the world with her husband Kevin, enjoying live music and dancing like no one’s watching. She also performs her own music for charity.


Guests describe the state park as an escape into the Old Florida wilderness, emoting a tugging feeling of nostalgia for an era that you haven’t lived in — but feel like you could belong to. The area was remote when Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings thrived there as a divorced writer. Only seven families lived in Cross Creek when she arrived.

The allure of isolation in the wilderness is an intriguing pull for many readers, idealizing the immersion experience.
SLIDESHOW

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings State Park continues to compel nature-lovers

Guests describe the state park as an escape into the Old Florida wilderness, emoting a tugging feeling of nostalgia for an era that you haven’t lived in — but feel like you could belong to. The area was remote when Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings thrived there as a divorced writer. Only seven families lived in Cross Creek when she arrived. The allure of isolation in the wilderness is an intriguing pull for many readers, idealizing the immersion experience.



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