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Wednesday, May 22, 2024
<p>Victoria Miller, a 21-year-old art history senior, makes and sells dreamcatchers out of vintage doilies on the popular handmade goods marketplace, Etsy.com, under the name “REVIVE by Victoria.”</p>

Victoria Miller, a 21-year-old art history senior, makes and sells dreamcatchers out of vintage doilies on the popular handmade goods marketplace, Etsy.com, under the name “REVIVE by Victoria.”

Victoria Miller combines second-hand doilies and entrepreneurship to create a unique result. Miller, a 21-year-old art history senior at UF, makes dreamcatchers and sells them online at the popular handmade goods marketplace, Etsy.

Dreamcatchers originated from Native American tribes in the mid-20th century. Many people believe a dreamcatcher will filter out evil spirits while they sleep when it is hung in a window or above their beds. Miller offers a modern, yet vintage twist to these traditional talismans.

“Most people think that I make the traditional Native American kind,” Miller said, “but mine are more vintage.”

Miller’s inspiration to start making dreamcatchers began online last winter break. She came across a blog on Fossil.com that featured a dreamcatcher with a crocheted doily in the center instead of the usual webbing.

“It was kind of hard to understand how to do it, so I just turned it into my own thing,” Miller said.

After getting doilies from her grandmother and thrift stores, Miller started making dreamcatchers. She tried different sizes, patterns and materials. After a while, she realized that she could not fill her whole house with dreamcatchers.

“I knew about Etsy and how it was all handmade and vintage, so I knew it was the perfect place to sell,” Miller said.

Opening the store was not as simple as she first thought. She had to write store policies, figure out prices and pick shipping methods. She finally opened the store “REVIVE by Victoria” on May 23.

“I wanted the name to be something to do with recycling — reusing old materials and making them into something new,” Miller said.

Since she opened the store, Miller has sold about a dozen dreamcatchers, the largest dreamcatcher selling for $65.

“I was surprised at how much someone will pay for a dreamcatcher,” Miller said. “I try to be reasonable, thinking about what I would charge my friends versus strangers.”

Miller received what, to her, was the biggest compliment of all when she was invited to enter an art show during the Florida Surfing Championships in Jacksonville, Fla.

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“I was so excited. Someone had seen my stuff and thought it was good enough to show other people,” Miller said.

With school, the about $150 booth-rental cost and the time it would take to make enough dreamcatchers, Miller decided to not do the art show. However, she is looking into some local shows and markets at which she could present.

Miller also sells United States rearview mirror decorations she makes from hangers that she twists into shape. She admittedly loves arts and crafts and said she always seems to be make things out of the unexpected.

“I recently brought home a box of my art stuff — just random objects — but I know I am going to make something out of it,” Miller said.

Although Miller does not necessarily believe in the power supposedly stored in dreamcatchers, she knows others believe in it or at least like their artistic value. It seems that popularity will continue to drive Miller’s sales and pay her bills.

Victoria Miller, a 21-year-old art history senior, makes and sells dreamcatchers out of vintage doilies on the popular handmade goods marketplace, Etsy.com, under the name “REVIVE by Victoria.”

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