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Saturday, April 17, 2021

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Todd and Michelle Yoder have been coming to UF home games for about 20 years. Of those two decades, about 15 or 16 were spent visiting in an RV. “When we first started coming, we slept in our van,” Michelle said. “After six or seven years of that, we were like ‘We’re going to get a motor home and tailgate.’”Ever since they moved to High Springs five years ago, their trips to Gainesville have become significantly easier and shorter.“People would ask us, ‘So are you still going to take the RV?’ because we only live like fifteen minutes away, and I’m like ‘Yeah, we’re going to bring the RV.”’ Todd said.This is the Yoder family’s first year in their new RV spot, which is located at the Norman Hall parking lot near Sorority Row. Todd said they had been in their old spot for about 13 years. Though they liked their old spot and the people around them, he said many of their friends have moved over to the new parking area.“We like it here better,” Michelle said.To keep these spots each year, they have to renew their spot a few months in advance during the summer. 
SLIDESHOW

Happy Campers: An RV tailgate

Todd and Michelle Yoder have been coming to UF home games for about 20 years. Of those two decades, about 15 or 16 were spent visiting in an RV. “When we first started coming, we slept in our van,” Michelle said. “After six or seven years of that, we were like ‘We’re going to get a motor home and tailgate.’”Ever since they moved to High Springs five years ago, their trips to Gainesville have become significantly easier and shorter.“People would ask us, ‘So are you still going to take the RV?’ because we only live like fifteen minutes away, and I’m like ‘Yeah, we’re going to bring the RV.”’ Todd said.This is the Yoder family’s first year in their new RV spot, which is located at the Norman Hall parking lot near Sorority Row. Todd said they had been in their old spot for about 13 years. Though they liked their old spot and the people around them, he said many of their friends have moved over to the new parking area.“We like it here better,” Michelle said.To keep these spots each year, they have to renew their spot a few months in advance during the summer. 


UF Hispanic Heritage Month hosted their annual Art Fest in the architecture courtyard on Tuesday evening.
The overall theme of the event was “The Streets of Old San Juan,” which featured activities and art pieces inspired by the art, cultureand landscape of Puerto Rico. The event aimed to promote “La Pasión por el arte,” or “passion for the arts.”
The event exhibited art and performances inspired by Hispanic-Latinx culture and heritage, food catered by Mi Apá Latin Café and artistic activities such as painting and DIY flower crowns. 
 
SLIDESHOW

UF Hispanic Heritage Month hosts annual Art Fest

UF Hispanic Heritage Month hosted their annual Art Fest in the architecture courtyard on Tuesday evening. The overall theme of the event was “The Streets of Old San Juan,” which featured activities and art pieces inspired by the art, cultureand landscape of Puerto Rico. The event aimed to promote “La Pasión por el arte,” or “passion for the arts.” The event exhibited art and performances inspired by Hispanic-Latinx culture and heritage, food catered by Mi Apá Latin Café and artistic activities such as painting and DIY flower crowns.   


Over 300 people gathered in the Phillips Center for the Performing Arts Sunday night to watch various acts perform in Soulfest, a multicultural talent show. Jania Lowe, a third-year public relations student and director of Soulfest, said the event is meant to showcase and celebrate the diversity and talent within The Gator Nation. The show, which is free for students, was started in 2000. Soulfest has a different theme every year. This year’s theme was Expedition Soulfest: Every Country is Gator Country. Lowe said the goal of this theme is to ensure the representation and inclusion of all Gators because The Gator Nation is global. 
“Every Gator from wherever they are from and wherever they go is a part of The Gator Nation,” Lowe said. 
This year’s Soulfest was sponsored by LIFEWTR, and students were able to submit an original art piece that represented the 2019 Soulfest theme. There were three winners of the competition, and their artwork will be displayed in the Reitz Union bookstore. LIFEWTR partnered with the event because they wanted to start a conversation of cultural expression through art. 
 
SLIDESHOW

Expedition Soulfest: Every Country is Gator Country

Over 300 people gathered in the Phillips Center for the Performing Arts Sunday night to watch various acts perform in Soulfest, a multicultural talent show. Jania Lowe, a third-year public relations student and director of Soulfest, said the event is meant to showcase and celebrate the diversity and talent within The Gator Nation. The show, which is free for students, was started in 2000. Soulfest has a different theme every year. This year’s theme was Expedition Soulfest: Every Country is Gator Country. Lowe said the goal of this theme is to ensure the representation and inclusion of all Gators because The Gator Nation is global.  “Every Gator from wherever they are from and wherever they go is a part of The Gator Nation,” Lowe said.  This year’s Soulfest was sponsored by LIFEWTR, and students were able to submit an original art piece that represented the 2019 Soulfest theme. There were three winners of the competition, and their artwork will be displayed in the Reitz Union bookstore. LIFEWTR partnered with the event because they wanted to start a conversation of cultural expression through art.   


Gainesville Police Department collected 134 unwanted guns Saturday during a gun buyback held in front of Fire Station #3, 900 NE Waldo Road. The event, which was held in collaboration with the Alachua County Christian Pastors Association, was designed to reduce the number of weapons that could potentially fall into the wrong hands. Officers offered gift cards with amounts ranging from $50 to $300 or the option to take an Xbox One in exchange for a weapon. In total, the police had $5,000 plus the Xboxes to trade for guns. Darry Lloyd, spokesperson for the State Attorney’s Office, said the money for the buyback came from forfeiture funds, money confiscated in connection to illegal activity. All weapons turned over to officers are set to be broken down and destroyed unless someone has reported the gun stolen.
SLIDESHOW

Gainesville police buy back 134 local guns

Gainesville Police Department collected 134 unwanted guns Saturday during a gun buyback held in front of Fire Station #3, 900 NE Waldo Road. The event, which was held in collaboration with the Alachua County Christian Pastors Association, was designed to reduce the number of weapons that could potentially fall into the wrong hands. Officers offered gift cards with amounts ranging from $50 to $300 or the option to take an Xbox One in exchange for a weapon. In total, the police had $5,000 plus the Xboxes to trade for guns. Darry Lloyd, spokesperson for the State Attorney’s Office, said the money for the buyback came from forfeiture funds, money confiscated in connection to illegal activity. All weapons turned over to officers are set to be broken down and destroyed unless someone has reported the gun stolen.


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