Skip to Content, Navigation, or Footer.
We inform. You decide.
Sunday, September 26, 2021

Opinion

Lil Dicky's "Earth" music video has more than 34 million views.
OPINION  |  EDITORIALS

Can Lil Dicky save the planet?

Most of us can agree climate change is a problem, and the Earth is facing a crisis, but unfortunately, there are also a lot of people who don’t agree. Recently, you may have seen a little video called “Earth” by Lil Dicky which, as we’re writing this, has 26 million views in just four days. The video is a modern day “We Are the People,” with famous singers like Ariana Grande, Justin Bieber, Snoop Dogg and many more singing about saving the planet. The video features cute animated animals and bold colors, but the message behind it is serious: If we don’t start doing more for the environment now, climate change will become irreversible. We’d say things are getting pretty serious if an artist named Lil Dicky has become one of our greatest environmental proponents.


Photo by Jonathan Cosens - JCP on Unsplash
OPINION  |  COLUMNS

Media is growing, and we’re growing apart

The idea of binging shows and the culture around streaming consumption has become harder to understand. They spread as more people come out to speak their hearts and minds in written, spoken or visually recorded means. Streaming platforms like Netflix, YouTube Premium and Hulu, in addition to regular cable TV, are oversaturating the public. This new, vast generation of streaming sites makes it hard to find those shows that bring us together.


Photo by Ivana Cajina on Unsplash
OPINION  |  COLUMNS

The curly hair revolution is here

All my childhood, I wanted pinstraight hair. The hair that grows out of my head is the exact opposite, curly like the corkscrew you use to open a bottle of wine. It’s hard for me to remember one classmate growing up who had curly hair. There was no one to share the trials and tribulations of having a hair type that requires half a bottle of conditioner. In high school, I abused my curls via over-shampooing, over-brushing and tugging on them to calm them down. It wasn’t until a few years ago that I realized my hair wasn’t the problem, but my brain — all thanks to the beauty and supportive nature of the curly hair community.


A view of St. Sebastian's Church damaged in blast in Negombo, north of Colombo, Sri Lanka, Sunday, April 21, 2019. More than hundred were killed and hundreds more hospitalized with injuries from eight blasts that rocked churches and hotels in and just outside of Sri Lanka's capital on Easter Sunday, officials said, the worst violence to hit the South Asian country since its civil war ended a decade ago. (AP Photo/Chamila Karunarathne)
OPINION  |  EDITORIALS

We mourn along with Sri Lanka

Easter, a day of celebration for Christians all over the world, turned into a day of mourning after three churches in three Sri Lankan cities were torn apart by bombs, wreaking havoc on families and friends in worship. The bombings have killed at least 207 people and injured 450 people. Officials believe the attacks, which also included bombings at high-end hotels in Sri Lanka, were carried out by suicide bombers in a coordinated act of terrorism.


OPINION  |  COLUMNS

Eating disorders can affect anyone, not just young women.

When people think of eating disorders, they often imagine a stick-thin woman comparing herself to models or Barbie dolls. We often fail to realize people of all body types struggle with eating disorders, including men. Parents worry about their daughters starving themselves but don’t think to check on their sons’ eating habits, despite the fact that one out of three people afflicted with an eating disorder is a man.


generic Darts and Laurels
OPINION  |  DARTS LAURELS

Darts and Laurels: April 19, 2019

You’re on your way to your final exam of the semester, and you should be going over equations in your head. Instead, your mind is thinking about summer days spent sleeping in and on home-cooked meals. The semester has flown by. There have been a few wins and a few losses, but you’ve made it through all the same. You find yourself with a small smile on your face, allowing yourself to revel in a little self-pride.


LTE generic
OPINION  |  LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Letter to the Editor: What SG and others can learn from Public Policy Career Day

On March 21, Chomp the Vote hosted the Public Policy Career Day inside of the Reitz Grand Ballroom. To put on the event, Chomp the Vote partnered with the Bob Graham Center, the UF International Center, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Beyond 120, the political science department, the College of Journalism and Communications, the Career Resource Center and Civic Duty Florida. The event featured more than 20 universities with public policy and administration programs, such as Tufts University, Johns Hopkins University and Columbia University, as well as employers from the public and private sector. The event director and planning team within Chomp staff created this event with the intention of bringing an event on campus for students to be exposed to educational and professional opportunities within the public policy sector.


OPINION  |  COLUMNS

SG banquet: Mac and cheese, prayer and cowboys

Well, I made it into the Student Government banquet this year, and it was a rather interesting event. For starters, they dropped around $20,000 on a banquet and ended up drinking out of disposable plastic cups. They are humble people, aren’t they?


OPINION  |  EDITORIALS

There’s another reason to take the sexual assault survey

If you’re a student at UF, you received an email from UF President Kent Fuchs encouraging students to fill out a campus climate survey on sexual assault and misconduct. It’s a survey that attempts to better understand sexual assault and sexual misconduct on college campuses. There are 33 universities conducting the survey, which is being conducted by the Association of American Universities, including UF.


Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash
OPINION  |  COLUMNS

Forget Hallmark holidays. Introducing: Instagram holidays

National Girlfriend Day. National Boyfriend Day. National Ex-Spouse Day. The list goes on and on. It seems to me that in recent times these “holidays” have grown in popularity thanks to the online societies unasked for and organic decision to use them as a reason to post. These are days when your feed is full of people posting about their significant others, whom they love and appreciate, but it has become an excuse to post a picture that you have had saved in your camera roll.


Photo by Blake Barlow on Unsplash
OPINION  |  COLUMNS

Do more responsibilities make us adults, or are we still figuring things out?

am not a history buff, but I imagine that in the past it was easy, or at least easier than today, to discern when a child became an adult. There were rituals, or rites of passage, that set clear limits. Plus, a child had to pass through those rituals much sooner in life than we do. My fiancee’s grandmother, for instance, was married at 18 years old and was a mother at 20. Marriage has often been considered a marker of adulthood. She and many others from her generation had, from our perspective, clipped childhoods and prolonged adulthoods.


My AirPods are fake, but they stand for something bigger
OPINION  |  COLUMNS

‘Fake’ is in the eye of the beholder.

Earlier this year, I wrote a column about how I owned a pair of fake AirPods. Well, I would like to write I have gotten a second pair that is much closer to the actual product. A trip online to an Asian wholesale website, a few extra dollars for express shipping and six days of waiting brought another pair of fake AirPods to my dorm. They came in a box with the same minimalist Apple style, a lightning cable that works for my phone and even some stamps. My first pair of imposters cost me $2 and were honestly a hassle. These fakes, however, have changed the game for me.


OPINION  |  EDITORIALS

The editorial board’s tour at UF Health Shands

A few weeks ago, the editorial board was invited to take a tour of UF Health Shands Hospital, specifically the pediatric units after we wrote the editorial, “What does it mean to do it ‘For The Kids’?” In the editorial, we posed questions we felt were not readily available to the general public concerning Dance Marathon at UF, such as how exactly money raised by DM is utilized. As a result, Shands representatives reached out to give us these answers and provide more transparency on how the money is spent in the children’s hospital.


[FILE PHOTO]
OPINION  |  COLUMNS

To Meme or Not To Meme?

It is time we talk about memes and meme culture. I love a good meme, and I assume you do as well, or else you wouldn’t be wasting your time reading a column about memes. Internet memes have become a prevalent part of a Millennial and Generation Z’s daily life. You could even say they have become a sort of coping mechanism. Memes represent the pent-up frustrations and passions of this time in history. Millennials are generally known to be in a worse off economic situation than the generation before, having been handed the failures of our ancestors without sufficient education to craft a solution. Those of us pursuing a college degree have to deal with incredibly high tuition costs and possibly immense student loans. Millennials are characterized as the “anxious generation,” and Generation Z has been reported as naming depression and anxiety as the biggest problems facing their peers, according to The Economist. The only way out of the unearned strife that has defined the short run-time of the third millennia is a good meme. But when should we create or share a meme? When should we not? It must be noted one cannot always meme, but then again there are times when a meme is the most essential service one can provide. For guidance, we look to Shakespeare’s most famed work, “The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark” or Hamlet, for short.


Powered by SNworks Solutions by The State News
All Content © 2021 The Independent Florida Alligator and Campus Communications, Inc.