CDC coronavirus

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

Alachua County reported seven new COVID-19 cases today, bringing the total number to 174. 

According to a daily report from the Florida Department of Health, all of the latest cases confirmed are Florida residents: 

  • 54-year-old female 

  • 44-year-old female

  • 47-year-old female

  • 50-year-old male

  • 43-year-old male

  • 30-year-old female 

  • 33-year-old female

No new cases were reported at UF today, leaving the total at 34. 

Gainesville sits at No.22 on the daily report’s list of Florida cities with confirmed cases has 131 reported. The city of Alachua has 11, Newberry has seven, Hawthorne has five, High Springs has three, Micanopy has three, Tioga has two, Archer has two and La Crosse has one. 

No COVID-19-related deaths have been reported in Alachua County. Aside from Leon County, which has 112 cases, Alachua is the only county in Florida with more than 100 cases and no related deaths reported

Despite providing information on hospitalizations and deaths, The Florida Department of Health has yet to begin reporting recovered cases. On their website, they state that they don’t measure recovery or expect to “have such a designation” anytime in the near future.

“Some states and countries measure a case as recovered when a person has had COVID-19 for more than 14 days, while others upon hospital discharge data neither of which completely capture recovery of the full COVID positive population,” they wrote in a statement to The Alligator today. 

Despite a backlog in Florida’s COVID-19 tests, Florida cases continue to rise, reaching nearly 19,000 tonight. There are now a total of 438 deaths, according to the Florida Department of Health. 

On the state department of health’s website, it shows that about 1,400 people across Florida are waiting on their test results. However, according to the Miami Herald, this is an undercount, as the state only reports the number of Floridians waiting to hear back from state labs, not private ones — which process more than 90 percent of the state’s tests. 

Contact Alex DeLuca at [email protected]. Follow her on Twitter @AlexLDeLuca.